Unique and diverse places of universal value!

UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES

Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations. Our cultural and natural heritage are both irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration.

Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations. Our cultural and natural heritage are both irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration. What makes the concept of World Heritage exceptional is its universal application. World Heritage sites belong to all the peoples of the world, irrespective of the territory on which they are located.

UNESCO’s World Heritage

World Heritage Sites in Pakistan

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Sites are places of outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity.  The programme was founded with the Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage which was adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO on 16 November 1972 in Paris. Pakistan ratified the convention on 23 July 1976, making its historical sites eligible for inclusion on the list. Since then, UNESCO has designated six sites in Pakistan as World Heritage Sites and twenty-six sites are on the tentative list.


Pakistan has six UNESCO World Heritage Sites in their country, all of which are cultural locations, as follows:

  • Ancient Monuments at Makli, Thatta , 1981
  • Archaeological Ruins of Moenjodaro, 1980
  • Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, 1981
  • Rohtas Fort, 1997
  • Taxila, 1980
  • Buddhist Ruins of Takht-i-Bahi & Remains at Sahr-i-Bahlol, 1980

Out of six, Punjab has three world Heritage Sites. Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, Rohtas Fort and Taxila

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Sites are places of outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity.  The programme was founded with the Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage which was adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO on 16 November 1972 in Paris. Pakistan ratified the convention on 23 July 1976, making its historical sites eligible for inclusion on the list. Since then, UNESCO has designated six sites in Pakistan as World Heritage Sites and twenty-six sites are on the tentative list.

 

 

Pakistan has six UNESCO World Heritage Sites in their country, all of which are cultural locations, as follows:

  • Ancient Monuments at Makli, Thatta , 1981
  • Archaeological Ruins of Moenjodaro, 1980
  • Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, 1981
  • Rohtas Fort, 1997
  • Taxila, 1980
  • Buddhist Ruins of Takht-i-Bahi & Remains at Sahr-i-Bahlol, 1980

Out of six, Punjab has three world Heritage Sites. Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, Rohtas Fort and Taxila

PUNJAB: WORLD HERITAGE SITES

Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, 1981
Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, 1981
Fort & Shalamar Gardens in Lahore, 1981

Lahore Fort and Shalamar Gardens

These are two masterpieces from the time of the brilliant Mughal civilization, which reached its height during the reign of the Emperor Shah Jahan. The fort contains marble palaces and mosques decorated with mosaics and gilt. The elegance of these splendid gardens, built near the city of Lahore on three terraces with lodges, waterfalls and large ornamental ponds, is unequalled. The inscribed property includes two distinct royal complexes, the Lahore Fort and the Shalimar Gardens, both located in the City of Lahore, at a distance of 7 km. from each other. The two complexes – one characterized by monumental structures and the other by extensive water gardens – are outstanding examples of Mughal artistic expression at its height, as it evolved during the 16th and 17th centuries.

 

The 21 monuments preserved within the boundaries of Lahore Fort comprise an outstanding repertory of the forms of Mughal architecture at its artistic and aesthetic height, from the reign of Akbar (1542-1605) through the reign of Shah Jahan (1627-58). Equally the Shalimar Gardens, laid out by Shah Jahan in 1641-2 embodies Mughal garden design at the apogee of its development. Both complexes together may be understood to constitute a masterpiece of human creative genius. (UNESCO)

 

For more info: https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/171/

These are two masterpieces from the time of the brilliant Mughal civilization, which reached its height during the reign of the Emperor Shah Jahan. The fort contains marble palaces and mosques decorated with mosaics and gilt. The elegance of these splendid gardens, built near the city of Lahore on three terraces with lodges, waterfalls and large ornamental ponds, is unequalled. The inscribed property includes two distinct royal complexes, the Lahore Fort and the Shalimar Gardens, both located in the City of Lahore, at a distance of 7 km. from each other. The two complexes – one characterized by monumental structures and the other by extensive water gardens – are outstanding examples of Mughal artistic expression at its height, as it evolved during the 16th and 17th centuries.

 

The 21 monuments preserved within the boundaries of Lahore Fort comprise an outstanding repertory of the forms of Mughal architecture at its artistic and aesthetic height, from the reign of Akbar (1542-1605) through the reign of Shah Jahan (1627-58). Equally the Shalimar Gardens, laid out by Shah Jahan in 1641-2 embodies Mughal garden design at the apogee of its development. Both complexes together may be understood to constitute a masterpiece of human creative genius. (UNESCO)

For more info: https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/171/

TAXILA MUSEUM: COLLECTION OF GANDHARAN ART

Foundation stone laid by Lord Chelmsford, Viceroy of India in 1918

The archaeological complex of Taxila

 Dharmarajika, an ancient stupa

Taxila Museum 1918

Taxila, is a vast serial site that includes a Mesolithic cave and the archaeological remains of four early settlement sites, Buddhist monasteries, and a Muslim mosque and madrassa. Situated strategically on a branch of the Silk Road that linked China to the West, Taxila reached its apogee between the 1st and 5th centuries. It is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Asia. The ruins of the four settlement sites at Taxila reveal the pattern of urban evolution on the Indian subcontinent through more than five centuries. One of these sites, the Bihr mound, is associated with the historic event of the triumphant entry of Alexander the Great into Taxila. The archaeological sites of Saraikala, Bhir, Sirkap, and Sirsukh are collectively of unique importance in illustrating the evolution of urban settlement on the Indian subcontinent. The Taxila serial site also includes Khanpur cave, which has produced stratified microlithic tools of the Mesolithic period, and a number of Buddhist monasteries and stupas of various periods. Buddhist monuments erected throughout the Taxila valley transformed it into a religious heartland and a destination for pilgrims from as far afield as Central Asia and China. The Buddhist archaeological sites at Taxila include the Dharmarajika complex and stupa, the Khader Mohra grouping, the Kalawan grouping, the Giri monasteries, the Kunala stupa and monastery, the Jandial complex, the Lalchack and the Badalpur stupa remains and monasteries, the Mohra Moradu monastic remains, the Pipplian and the Jaulian remains, and the Bahalar stupa and remains. (UNESCO)

 Dharmarajika, an ancient stupa

Taxila Museum 1918

Taxila, is a vast serial site that includes a Mesolithic cave and the archaeological remains of four early settlement sites, Buddhist monasteries, and a Muslim mosque and madrassa. Situated strategically on a branch of the Silk Road that linked China to the West, Taxila reached its apogee between the 1st and 5th centuries. It is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Asia. The ruins of the four settlement sites at Taxila reveal the pattern of urban evolution on the Indian subcontinent through more than five centuries. One of these sites, the Bihr mound, is associated with the historic event of the triumphant entry of Alexander the Great into Taxila. The archaeological sites of Saraikala, Bhir, Sirkap, and Sirsukh are collectively of unique importance in illustrating the evolution of urban settlement on the Indian subcontinent.

The Taxila serial site also includes Khanpur cave, which has produced stratified microlithic tools of the Mesolithic period, and a number of Buddhist monasteries and stupas of various periods. Buddhist monuments erected throughout the Taxila valley transformed it into a religious heartland and a destination for pilgrims from as far afield as Central Asia and China. The Buddhist archaeological sites at Taxila include the Dharmarajika complex and stupa, the Khader Mohra grouping, the Kalawan grouping, the Giri monasteries, the Kunala stupa and monastery, the Jandial complex, the Lalchack and the Badalpur stupa remains and monasteries, the Mohra Moradu monastic remains, the Pipplian and the Jaulian remains, and the Bahalar stupa and remains. (UNESCO)

Lahore Fort and Shalamar Gardens

Rohtas Fort is a 16th-century fortress located near the city of Jehlum in the Pakistani province of Punjab. The fort is one of the largest and most formidable in the subcontinent. Rohtas Fort was never stormed by force,[2] and has survived remarkably intact.

 

The fortress was built by Raja Todar Mal on the orders of Sher Shah Suri, partly to suppress the local gakhars tribes of then Potohar region. Some Khokhar tribes were allies of the Mughal Empire, and refused to recognize the suzerainty of Sher Shah Suri.

 

The fort is known for its large defensive walls, and several monumental gateways. Rohtas Fort was inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1997 for being an “exceptional example of the Muslim military architecture of Central and South Asia.”

Welcome to our World Heritage site Tours , An opportunity for you to visit the unique and extraordinary assortment of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. This special line of journeys has been artistically tailored to offer you to discover some of unique masterpieces created.

 

Our tours cover not only heritage sites, but also present to you cultural diversity, awe-inspiring scenery and real experience of community interaction of the places we visit.